Professional, Spectacular, Fleshly Music


On July 25, Greg Coleman posted a quote from AW Pink that states, in part:

The place which music now holds in many of our public services is a solemn “sign of the times” to those who have eyes to see. But is music wrong? Has not God Himself bestowed the gift? Surely, but what we are now complaining about is church-singing that is professional and spectacular, that which is of the flesh, and rendered to please the ear of man. The only music which ever passes beyond the roof of the church in which it is rendered is that which issues from born again people, who “sing with grace in their hearts unto the Lord.”

See Greg’s Post for the entire quote.

Bible Centered Worship

I’ve long been an antagonist of modern forms of Christian ‘worship’. Our spiritual forefathers worshiped God with reading long passages of Scripture, responsive reading of Psalms, long prayers, and long sermons. The purpose of Christian worship was and should be to glorify God and to impart grace to the hearer (Eph 4:29).

Tools of Rebellion, Now Tools of Worship?

In the time of the great revivals, worship services were modified to make the experience more attractive to non-believers. The business of Christian worship was less about the sacred praise from God’s elect and more about increasing numbers. Long prayers and Scripture reading was out, choirs, special music, jokes/illustrations, etc. were in. The organ was out, the piano was in, etc. The format and style of worship has continued to be more sensual (appealing to the senses) in the last hundred years. Today, the piano is out, guitars and drums are in.

Take Away

Music styled after the carnal music of the world, which appeals to the sensual feelings and emotions of the hearer is less of genuine worship and more of wicked compromise.

Why Are Evangelical Kids Turning Catholic?

A deadly side effect of this downward spiral is that young evangelicals are leaving the church in alarming numbers. Further, the children of the 90s ‘happy clappy, christian rock, teen study Bible’ crowd are leaving evangelical churches for Rome, Greek churches, and other forms of high liturgy. Why? They are seeking something that ‘feels’ more genuine that what they’ve been served. How sad when pagan compromise feels more ‘authentic’ than genuine Christian worship.

Does you church use electric guitars and drums in worship today? Don’t be surprised to observe robes, candles, and incense tomorrow.

See the following article for more on young pop-evangelicals moving over to Catholicism/Anglicanism: Young Evangelical Are Going High Liturgy.


See also:

Is Your Church Cool?

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One thought on “Professional, Spectacular, Fleshly Music

  1. Schwab: I actually came to faith not in a church but at a house with some peers late in high school. It was through singing songs in worship that I met Jesus for the first time, and it was the most powerful spiritual experience of my life. To me, as a young Christian, worship music was my primary connection to God. Participating with a group of my peers who were willing to give up their Friday nights to willingly get together to be the church was inspiring. For some reason, however I have always had a more difficult time finding that same connection in a church service. Today I know several guys who have a similar problem. We want to connect, to have a spiritual experience and connection but we feel self-conscious. We also feel like worship in church is kind of…lame and awkward. And as a result, many of us seem to have the musical part of “presenting our bodies as living sacrifices” cut off. Have you experienced this as a worship leader? And do you think there are reasons for this?

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